FANDOM


RandallThompson

Randall Thompson courtesy UVA Visual History Archive

Randall Thompson (April 21, 1899 – July 9, 1984) was an American composer, particularly noted for his choral works. He was the head of the McIntire Department of Music at the University of Virginia from 1941 to 1946, and was acting conductor of the Virginia Glee Club during the Glee Club 1942-1943 season.

CareerEdit

He attended Harvard University, became assistant professor of music and choir director at Wellesley College, and received a doctorate in music from the University of Rochester's Eastman School of Music. He went on to teach at the Curtis Institute of Music, at the University of Virginia from 1941 to 1946, and at Harvard. He is particularly noted for his choral works. He was an honorary member of the Rho Tau chapter of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity at Appalachian State University.

Thompson composed three symphonies and numerous vocal works including The Testament of Freedom, Frostiana, and The Peaceable Kingdom, inspired by Edward Hicks's painting. His most popular and recognizable choral work is his anthem, Alleluia, commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky for the opening of the Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood. He also wrote the operas Solomon and Balkis and The Nativity According to St. Luke.

Leonard Bernstein was one of Thompson's students at Harvard. His other notable students include Samuel Adler, Leo Kraft, Juan Orrego-Salas, John Davison, Thomas Beveridge, Charles Edward Hamm, William P. Perry, Christopher King, Frederic Rzewski, and David Borden.

In honor of Thompson's vast influence on male choral music, on May 2, 1964 he became the first recipient of the prestigious University of Pennsylvania Glee Club Award of Merit[1]. Established in 1964, this award sought "to bring a declaration of appreciation to an individual each year that has made a significant contribution to the world of music and helped to create a climate in which our talents may find valid expression." He was also a recipient of Yale University's Sanford Medal.[2]

WorksEdit

Choral worksEdit

OperasEdit

SymphoniesEdit

  • Symphony No. 1 - 1931
  • Symphony No. 2 - 1931
  • Symphony No. 3 - 1947-49

String QuartetsEdit

  • Quartet no. 1 in D minor
  • Quartet no. 2 in G major (1967)

GalleryEdit

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit

This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors). Smallwikipedialogo

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.